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Slow is Fast – Why Going Slow will Make You a Better Rider

It feels exciting to learn quickly, to do a lot, to add to a list of accomplishments. It feels good to work hard, to raise the jumps, canter longer, practice all the lateral movements of dressage, or get through the trail ride on the fractious horse.

Even if we are anxious through the process, the more we do the more accomplished we feel and the more satisfied we feel with our progress as we can look back and “tick the boxes” of all we practiced.

However, going too fast and doing too much often creates only the illusion of progress.

Real progress, the kind that builds lasting skill, that creates confidence, and that builds a foundation allowing for more opportunity and potential in the future; this kind of progress is slow.

This is true for both our development as riders as well as the training of our horses.

Slow is fast. I will explain three reasons why in the video below.

Discover several key skills every rider needs and change how you learn riding in the Free Workshop from my Balanced Riding Course.

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